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Anoles
1. bark anole (Anolis distichus)
2. brown anole (Anolis sagrei)
3. American green anole (A. carolinensis)
4. Cuban green anole (A. porcatus)
5. crested anole (A. cristatellus)
6. knight anole (A. equestris)
7 Puerto Rican crested anole ( A. cristatellus cristatellus)
8. Cook's anole ( A. cooki)
anole
anole
Puerto Rican crested anole (A. cristatellus cristatellus) , Jobos National Estuary, Puerto Rico, 2007.
anole
anole
Common grass anole (Anolis pulchellus), University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, 2007.
crested anole
crested anole (Anolis cristatellus), Crandon Park, Key Biscayne, FL, USA, 2007.
bark anole
bark anole
Bark anole (Anolis distichus), Gifford Arboretum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA. 2006.

Top: As you can see, it has well-suited camouflage for moving on bark.

Bottom: This individual is shedding.
brown anole
brown anole dewlap
brown anole
brown anole
brown anole
brown anole
Top 6 photos: brown anole (Anolis sagrei).  Note the difference in coloration patters of these species.  Granted the light and dark coloration can change within an individual because anoles can change the shade of their skin and in some species from green to brown.  Nonetheless the pattern on the skin is quite different.  Some have a reticulated pattern that various between individuals.  Others have no distinct pattern at all (left).  The typical dorsal stripe is nonexistent in some species.  Also some individuals have a reddish head. Others have a large crest that runs from the tail to the top of the head.

The only consistent characteristics is that they are some shade of brown and their dewlap is orange with a yellow border.
America green anole at Archbold
female green anole
America green anole (Anolis carolinensis), Archbold Biological Station, Florida, 2009.
Top: This is the best photo I have of a green anole dewlap. I saw him while conducting an experiment in the sandhill scrub.
Bottom: As green anoles can change colors from green to brown, this female is in the brown color condition.
anole
anole
common grass anole (A. pulchellus), University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PR, 2007.
anole
Puerto Rican crested anole (A. cristatellus cristatellus) , Jobos National Estuary, Puerto Rico, 2007
crested anole
Anolis cooki, Jobos National Estuary, Puerto Rico, 2007.

This anole is the only anole that is endangered on Puerto Rico. Though I saw it at Jobos, it usually is not this far to the east. All its known populations are on the southwest coast. I'll have to get more documentation to make sure that is indeed A. cooki, but it definely appears to be A. cooki and not A. cristatellus.
green iguana
green anole (Anolis carolinensis), Brickell, FL, USA.
Anolis porcatus
Though this individual looks like a green anole, it is a Cuban green anole (A. porcatus).  Some individuals have blue stripes on their backs, but all of the individuals I have seen only have a few blue scales like this one.

***According to Jonathon Losos, a leading expert in Anolis species, Cuban green anoles and American green anoles are so closely related they might not be separate species.

bark anole
Knight anole (Anolis equestris), Gifford Arboretum, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA. 2006

brown anole
brown anole
Above two photos: brown anole (Anolis sagrei), Indian Hammock Park, Miami, FL, USA. Note the visible crest on the neck and back. Sometimes brown anoles are crested as pronounced as this one. The way to distinguish brown and crested anoles apart is by dewlap color. Crested anoles (A. cristatellus) have dewlap with a yellow interior and orange-red edge, basically the opposite of the brown anole.

brown anole
brown anole
brown anole
Top 3 photos: brown anole (Anolis sagrei).  More divergent coloration patterns between individuals and between male and females (bottom).

crested anole
crested anole (Anolis cristatellus), Fairchild Botanical Garden, Miami, FL, USA.  The prominent crest on the tail that looks like a sailfish crest identifies a crested anole.  However, sometimes they lack the crest.  The best characteristic to distinguish the species is the dewlap.  The crested anole dewlap is yellow with an orange border, and the brown anole is the opposite.
 



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