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Red Cage (Clathrus ruber), University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA, 2006. This beautiful fungus smells like rotting meat, which attracts insects.  Flies and insects come to lay eggs in the rotting meat, but instead serve as a vector for spore dispersal. 
 

Starfish sp., San Quintin, Baja California, Mexico. 2007.  Unfortunately I do not know the species.

 
Earth star sp., Grossman Hammock, Everglades, FL, USA. 2007.  Unfortunately I do not know the species.

 
Southeastern lubber grasshopper nymph (Rhomalea microptera), Grossman Hammock, Everglades, FL, USA. 2007.  
 

Zebratail (Heliconius charithonia), Grossman Hammock, Everglades, FL, USA. 2007.  This butterfly only lays its eggs on Passiflora spp. Vines.  The eggs hatch and the caterpillars eat the vine.  The vine contains toxic glycoprotein that the butterfly has adapted to digest.  However, vines with high levels of the toxins can still be difficult to digest, leading to the death of the caterpillars.  For this reason the butterfly is very selective where it lays it eggs.  It  will not simply dump eggs like many moths will.
 

Southeastern lubber grasshopper (Rhomalea microptera) nymphs, Grossman Hammock, Everglades, FL, USA. 2007. 

Miscellaneous pictures
 
Sand crab (I do not know the species.), Bahia Honda, Florida Everglades, FL, USA. 2007.
 
 
dragonfly, Anhinga Trail, Everglades, FL, USA. 2006.
 
 
Monarch butterfly?. Bahia Honda, Florida Keys, FL, USA.
 
Red Cage (Clathrus ruber), University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA, 2006.  This is the fungus before it opens up to expose a red cage-like reproductive body that smells like rotting meat.  
European honey bee (Apis mellifera), Lake Placid, FL, USA, 2007.

Monarch butterfly?, Bahia Honda, Florida Keys, FL, USA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

same individual as above

 

orb spider, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, USA